3. How often should I do cardio?

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3. How often should I do cardio?

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It is important to understand the difference between cardio and burn fat, many people confuse the two. Cardio is to
strengthen the heart muscle (heart). The body burns fat in two ways:

Long and slow energy expenditure.
High-intensity workouts / interval cardiovascular exercises (sprints, running on the treadmill, ladders, etc.) To
answer the question posed, cardio every day is the most appropriate. Cardiovascular exercise is a workout, and just
like weight lifting, the muscle breaks down and the body produces cortisol (the hormone that turns the muscle into an
energy source).

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you’re short on time, you can increase the intensity and do 150 minutes per week of vigorous cardio, enough that you’re working hard enough so that you can no longer hold a conversation. Spread your workouts throughout the day and week, as long as each session lasts at least 10 minutes.

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You should do as much cardio as it takes to achieve your goals and no more, and it shouldn’t be so much that it significantly impairs your physical performance, recovery, or health.

If that sounds overly cautious to you, I understand. I make cardio sound like a medicine that you carefully dose to beat the disease without wrecking your body in the process.

That metaphor is more accurate than many people realize, though.

Research shows that endurance athletes are at a higher risk of heart dysfunction than the general, non-running public, and that the older they get and the more miles they log, the worse the problem gets.
Research shows that marathoners develop more arterial plaque than sedentary non-runners, which increases the risk of stroke and dementia.
The more cardio you do, the more you stress your body, and if take it too far, you can wind up in a state of chronic stress wherein your body can’t adequately recover from your workouts.
Hang around dyed-in-the-wool endurance athletes for a bit and you’ll quickly notice how many people have trouble with their knees, backs, hips, tendons, and bones.
While it’s a bit sensationalistic to say doing too much cardio can kill you, there’s some truth there.

The reality is if your goal is to look and feel good, more cardio–and exercise in general–is not always better. Moderate amounts improve health but too much impairs it.

So, with that overture on the subject in place, let’s take a closer look at how your goals should dictate how cardio you do.

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