I AM 42 I AM CURLING SINGLE ARM 35 KILOS 8 REPS I AM STUCK ON 17 3/4 IN ARMS ANY TIPS WOULD BE GREAT.

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I AM 42 I AM CURLING SINGLE ARM 35 KILOS 8 REPS I AM STUCK ON 17 3/4 IN ARMS

ANY TIPS WOULD BE GREAT.

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Single-Arm Dumbbell Snatch
Snatches build world-class power and a thick set of traps. The problem is, most lifters sit in a constant kyphotic position and look more like the hunchback of Notre Dame than an athlete. Coupled with push dominant training and poor mobility/stability, barbell snatches can leave the shoulders feeling torn apart.

The single-arm dumbbell snatch is the perfect middle ground. You get explosive hip extension plus unilateral overhead strength in a more shoulder-friendly position. As an added benefit, single arm-overhead work forces your quadratus lumborum to kick in (an aid in trunk stabilization) and crushes your obliques.
How to do it: Start with a dumbbell between your legs in the hang position. Propel the dumbbell upwards by driving through your heels and fully extending the hips. Drive the elbow high and catch the dumbbell overhead with the knees slightly bent.
– Single-Arm Push Press
Overhead presses are excellent for developing total body strength and stability. Taken a step further, the push press – using a dip and leg drive – teaches you to generate force through the lower body before transferring the force to the upper body and stabilizing everything from your wrist to ankle. Unfortunately, due to shoulder mobility and stability restrictions, barbells aren’t conducive to excellent shoulder health. By replacing the barbell with a dumbbell, you can press overhead through a natural range of motion to build stability while developing explosive total body power.

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Dumbbell Split Row
Dumbbell rows are an excellent horizontal pulling exercise, but most lifters look like they’re trying to pull-start a lawn mower when they do them. This severely limits the bang-for-your buck benefits of single-arm rows. More often than not, torso rotation replaces scapular retraction as the primary mover of the weight.

To maximize reward and minimize risk, you need to adopt a split stance and stand perpendicular to the bench. This slight change allows you to row huge weight for strength and mass while significantly increasing the anti-rotation and anti-flexion demands of your typical row. This builds an injury resistant trunk while allowing you to hoist heavy weights for better pulling strength.

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I have a good arm workout that you should try. I got it out of an old bodybuilding magazine but it is an awesome
routine. Take a light barbell, say 80 lbs. (approx. 36 kilos). And do barbell curls with this weight this is how the
workout goes…

Set 1 do 8 reps then rest for 15 seconds
Set 2 do 8 reps then rest for 15 seconds
Set 3 do 8 reps then rest for 15 seconds
Set 4 do 8 reps then rest for 15 seconds
Set 5 do 8 reps then rest for 15 seconds
Set 6 do 8 reps then rest for 15 seconds

The key is to only rest 15 seconds between sets. You will be surprised at how hard this workout actually is, chances
are that you will not be able to do all 6 sets for 8 reps for the first few workouts. This workout will pump your arms
like crazy. As soon as you can complete all 6 sets with 8 reps, you need to add weight to the barbell.

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