Is a bipod that pivots better then one that dose not? Im clueless to what i should use...pivot or no pivot? (Never seen this asked)

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Is a bipod that pivots better then one that dose not? Im clueless to what i should use…pivot or no pivot?
(Never seen this asked)

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I think most people who use non pivoting bipods are bench shooting. A pivoting bipod would help track a moving target easier and would be more advantageous to use while hunting.

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It’s not that bad if you have a bipod that you can tighten the tension a bit more so it won’t turn too easily. I haven’t had any issues doing so with an Atlas or Harris bipod. That being said, the Atlas is $200+ and Harris is $100 respectively. Atlas also adds a decent bit of weight to the rifle as well. Probably the easiest and most cost effective solution is to throw your pack on the ground and use it as a rest for your rifle.

Edit: Also another caveat. If you use a bipod make sure you zero your rifle on the type of ground you’ll be shooting off of. If you zero with your bipod on the grass and shoot a round while your bipod is on rocks the harmonics will be affected and may throw off your shot at distance.

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Short distances and possible moving animals, i’d want one that would pivot. For taking long range shots, I wouldn’t want a bipod that pivots at all

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If you’re talking pivot like to traverse the rifle even a pivot won’t do much without moving your body or the bipod. And with a Harris style it’s mounted to a fixed position on the rifle.
I find shooting sticks or tripods to be the most versatile.

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I have tried them all. Primos trigger sticks is the best I have found. Quick and easy adjustments with little movement. Just my 2 cents

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