White rice consumption linked to diabetes. Is this a fallacy?

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It depends on the context. In the general population, where a lot of people are sedentary, overweight and not eating enough fiber, replacing white rice with brown rice higher in fiber is generally a good idea. If you’re active, not overweight and eat enough fiber it’s unlikely to make a meaningful difference

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When it comes to your risk of diabetes, a new study by Harvard researchers suggests that eating less white rice could make a difference.

Each additional daily serving of white rice, a staple of Asian diets, may increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes by 10%, according to the study, which analyzed the results of four previous studies involving 352,384 participants from four countries: China, Japan, U.S. and Australia. Those who ate the highest amounts of white rice had a 27% higher risk of diabetes than those who ate the least, and the risk was most pronounced in Asian people.

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Eating white rice regularly, as is commonly done in many Asian countries, may increase risk for developing type 2 diabetes, a new study shows.

Researchers looked at data from four studies: two in Asian countries (China and Japan) and two in Western countries (the U.S. and Australia). All participants were diabetes-free when the studies began.

On average, people from Asian countries ate about four servings of white rice daily. Individuals in Western countries, however, ate less than five servings a week. The study found that the more servings of white rice a person eats per day, the greater their risk for developing type 2 diabetes, the form of diabetes most closely linked to obesity.

According to the new study, diabetes risk rises by about 10% with each increased serving per day of white rice.

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